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Argentine Grand Prix

Circuit Buenosaires.png
Argentine Grand Prix
Flag 22px-Flag of Argentina.png
Circuit Buenos Aires Circuit
Circuit image
Laps 72
Circuit length km 4.259
Race length km 306.648
Circuit length mi 2.646
Race length mi 190.542
Most wins driver 22px-Flag of Argentina.png Juan Manuel Fangio (4)
Most wins constructor 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png Williams (4)
Current year 1998
Winner 22px-Flag of Germany.png Michael Schumacher
Winning team 3dflagsdotcom italy2bs.gif Ferrari
Winning time 1:48:36.175
Pole driver 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png David Coulthard
Pole team 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png McLaren-Mercedes
Pole time 1:25.852
Fastest lap driver 22px-Flag of Austria.png Alexander Wurz
Fastest lap team 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png Benetton-Playlife
Fastest lap 1:28.179


The Argentine Grand Prix was a round of the Formula One championship, held intermittently from 1953 to 1998. Although it is no longer on the Formula One calendar, the race has a long and varied history. Argentine president Juan Perón was the driving force behind the creation of the circuit, after seeing the success of the country's own Juan Manuel Fangio.

Built just outside of Buenos Aires on swampland in 1952, the "Autódromo", as it was known, featured a white archway dedicated to the memory of Admiral Guillermo Brown (William Brown). The circuit opened in March 1952 with the running of the "Perón Cup", which was won by Fangio. In 1953, the Autodrome hosted the first ever Formula One race held outside Europe. The race saw native son Fangio retire his Maserati after 36 laps due to a transmission failure; Alberto Ascari's victory for Ferrari was tragically overshadowed by a stadium accident which killed nine people.

The following year, Fangio did reach the top step of the podium, winning his home Grand Prix on his second attempt; he would go on to win three of the next four Grands Prix in Argentina. In 1958, Stirling Moss took the win, in what would be the penultimate race in Fangio's distinguished career. With his retirement, and with the exile of Peron (in 1955) leading to several unstable governments, the Argentine Grand Prix disappeared from the F1 calendar in 1961 for over a decade.

A non-championship Formula One race was held at Buenos Aires in 1971, won by Chris Amon over two heats. In 1972 the Argentine Grand Prix returned to the World Championship, with Carlos Reutemann emerging as the new homegrown hero. Reutemann took pole position in his world championship debut, becoming only the second driver to achieve this feat. The race was won by world champion Jackie Stewart. The Grand Prix remained in Argentina through 1981, but the 1982 event was canceled.

A private consortium purchased the track in 1991 and began to upgrade it. They got on the 1994 F1 season calendar, but the race (set for October) was aborted to continue modernization. The modernized Argentine Grand Prix returned in 1995, with victory going to Damon Hill. Hill would win the event again in 1996 (his championship season), and in 1997 Jacques Villeneuve won the race in his championship season. Unfortunately, with the organizers of the event running into financial difficulties, the 1998 race was the last running of the Argentine Grand Prix, the checkered flag waving victory to Michael Schumacher, in his ninth win for Ferrari.

Winners

Multiple winners (drivers)

Number of wins Driver Achieved
4 22px-Flag of Argentina.png Juan Manuel Fangio 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957
2 22px-Flag of Brazil.png Emerson Fittipaldi 1973, 1975
22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png Damon Hill 1995, 1996

By Year

Year Driver Constructor Location Report
1998 22px-Flag of Germany.png Michael Schumacher Ferrari Buenos Aires Report
1997 22px-Flag of the Canada.png Jacques Villeneuve Williams-Renault Buenos Aires Report
1996 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png Damon Hill Williams-Renault Buenos Aires Report
1995 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png Damon Hill Williams-Renault Buenos Aires Report
1994
-
1982
Not held
1981 22px-Flag of Brazil.png Nelson Piquet Brabham-Ford Buenos Aires Report
1980 22px-Flag of Australia.png Alan Jones Williams-Ford Buenos Aires Report
1979 22px-Flag of France.png Jacques Laffite Ligier-Ford Buenos Aires Report
1978 22px-Flag of the United States.png Mario Andretti Lotus-Ford Buenos Aires Report
1977 22px-Flag of South Africa.png Jody Scheckter Wolf-Ford Buenos Aires Report
1976 Not held
1975 22px-Flag of Brazil.png Emerson Fittipaldi McLaren-Ford Buenos Aires Report
1974 22px-Flag of New Zealand.png Denny Hulme McLaren-Ford Buenos Aires Report
1973 22px-Flag of Brazil.png Emerson Fittipaldi Lotus-Ford Buenos Aires Report
1972 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png Jackie Stewart Tyrrell-Ford Buenos Aires Report
1971 22px-Flag of New Zealand.png Chris Amon Matra Buenos Aires Report
1970
-
1961
Not held
1960 22px-Flag of New Zealand.png Bruce McLaren Cooper-Climax Buenos Aires Report
1959 Not held
1958 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png Stirling Moss Cooper-Climax Buenos Aires Report
1957 22px-Flag of Argentina.png Juan Manuel Fangio Maserati Buenos Aires Report
1956 3dflagsdotcom italy2bs.gif Luigi Musso
22px-Flag of Argentina.png Juan Manuel Fangio
Ferrari Buenos Aires Report
1955 22px-Flag of Argentina.png Juan Manuel Fangio Mercedes-Benz Buenos Aires Report
1954 22px-Flag of Argentina.png Juan Manuel Fangio Maserati Buenos Aires Report
1953 3dflagsdotcom italy2bs.gif Alberto Ascari Ferrari Buenos Aires Report



Races in the Formula One championship:
2007 championship Grand Prix events:

Australian | Malaysian | Bahrain | Spanish | Monaco | Canadian | U.S. | French | British
German | European| Hungarian | Turkish | Italian | Belgian | Japanese | Chinese | Brazilian

Past championship Grand Prix events:

Argentine | Austrian | Dutch | Indy 500 | Las Vegas | Luxembourg | Mexican | Morocco
Pacific | Pescara | Portuguese | San Marino | South African | Swedish | Swiss | USA East | USA West

Confirmed future Grand Prix events:

Abu Dhabi | Korean | European | Singapore