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Ferrari F2002


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The Ferrari F2002 was one of the most dominant Formula One car designs of all time, designed by Ross Brawn, Rory Byrne, and Paolo Martinelli. It won twenty Grand Prix between 2002-2003.

The car was much lighter than its predecessor, the F2001. Powered by a 3.0 litre V10 engine which had a very low centre of gravity, the F2002 had excellent handling. Bridgestone developed special tyres, suited specifically for the car. Aerodynamically, the Ferrari was well ahead of the contemporary Williams BMW but perhaps a little down on power, and on a par with the 2002 season's McLaren car.

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Engine

Transmission

Gearbox: Ferrari Seven Speed Longitudinal Sequential with one reverse gear


Chassis

Dimensions

  • Wheelbase: 3012mm
  • Front Track: 1470mm
  • Rear Track: 1405mm

The majority of the conceptual design work for the Ferrari F2002 was by Ferrari's legendary South African chassis designer Rory Byrne and the engine design by Ferrari's Paolo Martinelli. The project was overseen by the team's technical director Ross Brawn. A vast army of other team personnel oversaw the running of the team and the project.

Previous to the inroduction of the F2002 had used their championship winning Ferrari F2001. However the F2002 was not only a development of this car but a completely revolutionary model involving many technologies not seen previously. Since the late 1990s Ferrari had been using the same basic concept and design of gearbox and although this had been used to win drivers and constructors titles from 1999 onwards the technical team pushed ahead with a new version instead. The new replacement gearbox casing was made of ultra lightweight and higher strength titanium, thus reducing its weight by as much as 15% and lowering the cars centre of gravity. The new compact design allowed for great advancement in the bodywork and increasing the car's aerodynamic efficiency at the rear. However such was the extent of the gearbox casing redesign that the aerodynamic work was left behind scheducle and initially did not represent the same performance gains as the mechanical engineering. Thus Ferrari continued its design for another two months and only first used the F2002 at the third round of the 2002 season having been using the previous year's F2001 chassis, albeit with many alterations and the inclusion of the Ferrari 051 2002 engine. Other advancements on the car include the clutchless direct shift technology within the gearbox, a new fluid traction control system to replace the previous 2001 traction control system, and upright aerodynamically shaped periscopic exhaust outlets at the rear. The latter technology was incorporated both to use the hot exhaust gases for aerodynamic effct but to raise these gases higher and out the way of the rear suspension. On previous occasion Ferrari's non chimneyed top exiting exhaust outlets had caused the rear suspension and other elements at the rear of the car to overheat or even melt when minor cracks occurred.

At its first race the F2002 was victorious, being driven by Michael Schumacher and continuing Ferrari's trend since 1999 for its cars to win on their debut. Michael Schumacher clinched second on the grid and after a first lap altercation with Juan Pablo Montoya, took a somewhat easy win from his brother Michael's Williams. There was some controversy surrounding tyre allocation because the team only had one F2002 chassis at the race. Therefore Schumacher's spare car was a F2001 chassis and because the two chassis used different wheel rim designs each required separate wheels and tyres. It was thus argued that Schumacher had in-effect twice the allocation of tyres as any other driver. The controversy was managed by Ferrari agreeing to aggregate their tyre usuage between the two cars, ensuring that Schumacher used the same total number of tyres as all the other drivers.

The car was first used in the Brazilian Grand Prix driven by Michael Schumacher. What followed was a season of domination which hadn't been seen since McLaren's 1988 season. Schumacher scored 10 more victories, a record in a season and was world champion in record time, winning the championship at the 11th race of the season in France, while Rubens Barrichello scored four. The two drivers were comfortably first and second in the drivers' championship, and Ferrari scored as many points (221) as the rest of the teams put together.

The F2002 was still competitive at the beginning of 2003, and Schumacher took the car's last win in the San Marino Grand Prix before it was replaced by the F2003-GA for the next race.

The car took 16 wins out of 20 starts, scored 253 points, 12 pole positions and contributed to 2 drivers' and constructors' world championships.

See also

External links


Ferrari Formula One cars
40s 1950s 1960s 1970s
8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
125 275
340
375
500 553
625
555
D50
801 412
246
256 156 158
1512
312 312 B 312 T
1980s 1990s 2000s
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
312 T 126 C 156/85 F1/86 F1/87 640 641 642/643 F92A F93A 412T F310/B F300 F399 F1-2000 F2001 F2001
F2002
F2002B
F2003-GA
F2004 F2004M
F2005
248 F2007


3dflagsdotcom italy2bs.gif Scuderia Ferrari
Personnel:
22px-Flag of France.png Jean Todt | 3dflagsdotcom italy2bs.gif Mario Almondo | 3dflagsdotcom italy2bs.gif Stefano Domenicali | 3dflagsdotcom italy2bs.gif Luca Baldisseri
Current drivers:
22px-Flag of Finland.png Kimi Räikkönen | 22px-Flag of Brazil.png Felipe Massa | 3dflagsdotcom italy2bs.gif Luca Badoer | 3dflagsdotcom italy2bs.gif Giancarlo Fisichella (Test Driver) 22px-Flag of Spain.png Marc Gené (Test Driver)
Notable Former drivers:
22px-Flag of Germany.png Michael Schumacher | 3dflagsdotcom italy2bs.gif Alberto Ascari | 22px-Flag of Argentina.png Juan Manuel Fangio | 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png Mike Hawthorn | 22px-Flag of Austria.png Niki Lauda | 22px-Flag of South Africa.png Jody Scheckter | 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png John Surtees | 22px-Flag of the United States.png Phil Hill | 22px-Flag of Brazil.png Rubens Barrichello | 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png Eddie Irvine | 22px-Flag of France.png Jean Alesi | 22px-Flag of France.png Alain Prost | 22px-Flag of the United Kingdom.png Nigel Mansell | 22px-Flag of Austria.png Gerhard Berger | 3dflagsdotcom italy2bs.gif Michele Alboreto | 22px-Flag of France.png René Arnoux | 22px-Flag of France.png Patrick Tambay | 22px-Flag of the Canada.png Gilles Villeneuve | 22px-Flag of Argentina.png Carlos Reutemann | 20px-Flag of Switzerland.png Clay Regazzoni | 22px-Flag of the United States.png Mario Andretti | 22px-Flag of Belgium (civil).png Jacky Ickx | 22px-Flag of Germany.png Wolfgang Graf Berghe von Trips | 3dflagsdotcom italy2bs.gif Lorenzo Bandini
Formula One cars:
125 | 275 | 340 | 375 | 500 | 553 | 625 | 555 | D50 | 801 | 412 | 246 | 256 | 156 | 158 | 1512 | 312 | 312B | 312T | 126C | 156/85 | F1/86 | F1/87 | 640 | 641 | 642 | 643 | F92A | F93A | 412T | F310 | F310B | F300 | F399 | F1-2000 | F2001 | F2002 | F2002B | F2003-GA | F2004 | F2004M | F2005 | 248 | F2007 | F2008 | F60 | F10 | 150° Italia | F2012